Galentine’s Day

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Valentine’s Day has become a very singular holiday in our culture. If you aren’t a young sexy straight person, the weeks from New Year’s Day to the middle of February are chock-full of sentimental ring commercials and Victoria’s Secret underwear campaigns reminding you that if you aren’t being seduced by a smoldering architect on the night of the 14th, you’re basically doing life wrong. Hallmark isn’t selling cards meant for your supportive grandmother that gives you $300 a month to help pay the rent or your cool manager who lets you use her expensive hand cream during meetings. For those of us who are either unattached or otherwise happen to like humans besides the ones we’re currently dating, V-Day is an isolating experience that’ll make you feel like a whale in a mall that only sells horse clothes (how’d you get in there, anyway?).

But lo, in 2010, from the annals of network television emerged a new holiday, one that should have been invented 400 years ago when the first pilgrim woman was left without a square dance partner on Sexy New America Day, the precursor to modern Valentine’s Day (trust me, I was a history major, this is all steeped in total factual accuracy). This bright, shining tribute to the most pure love that exists in the universe is Galentine’s Day. Amidst all the drama and upheaval, this holiday is about celebrating the constant, supportive presences that bring joy to a woman’s life.

As someone who was late to the game in the female friendship arena (I didn’t really make any gal pals until college), Galentine’s Day represents a chance to make up for a lot of bad girl energy I’ve put into the world before. We’re all guilty of those times we don’t pick up the phone when a friend calls because we’ve got a hot date later or when we’ve felt competitive with one of our main ladies when an attractive man enrolls in our ornithology class, but today is a day to recognize the bonds that endure long after the silly problems are in the rearview.

So this year, I’m bringing you a special Galentine’s Day recipe, a sumptuous breakfast treat even Leslie Knope couldn’t resist. This stuffed French toast is warm, sweet, and hearty, just like a girl’s most trusted friends. So gather around the breakfast table and pay testament to the love that lasts.

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Galentine’s Day Stuffed French Toast

Ingredients
1 loaf French bread
3 Tablespoons any flavor fruit spread (jelly, jam, or fresh fruit also make great substitutes)
½ package cream cheese (4 ounces, room temperature)
2 eggs
1 tablespoon cinnamon
½ cup skim milk
2 tablespoons butter

Instructions
Heat your skillet or electric griddle to 325 degrees.

Cut French bread into 2-3 inch wide slices. Then, with a paring knife, go back and cut halfway into each slice in the center, creating a ‘pocket’ that your fruit mixture can be stuffed into.

In a bowl, place the room temperature cream cheese and three tablespoons of your fruit spread and mix well.

In a separate bowl, break 2 eggs; add cinnamon and milk and mix thoroughly. If you’re feeling particularly warmhearted, imagine that these two bowls filled with different tasty ingredients that work well together are each other’s Galentine’s.

Now, take fruit mixture and stuff into the ‘pockets’ of your French bread slices. Place on a baking sheet.
When done stuffing each piece of bread, completely coat each piece in egg mixture. Make sure all sides are covered. Do all pieces before starting to fry.

Put 2 tablespoons of butter into a hot skillet and melt completely. Add all of the bread to the skillet and cook for 3-6 minutes on each side, until it reaches a nice golden brown. You want to make sure the cream cheese mixture heats through.

When done cooking, serve immediately with butter, syrup, and love.

Post by Bailey James, who has no need for smoldering architects. Recipe and photos from Tasty Kitchen.

  • Wow that French toast looks divine; just what you need to really celebrate Galentines in style 😉

    But for serious though: What’s with this trope of the “smoldering architect”? Are there really that many single and attractive brooding architects rolling around looking for love and living the romantic-comedy lifestyle? ((And if they are really out there where can I find one))